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End of the Forecasting Season for the Vancouver Island Avalanche Bulletin

April 10, 2016 at 08:33PM

The forecasting season comes to a close today for the Vancouver Island Avalanche Bulletin.

There is still plenty of snow in the Island Alps and avalanche hazard.

For excellent advice on how to manage spring hazards please visit the following page on the Avalanche Canada Website:

http://www.avalanche.ca/fxresources/spring_ovw.pdf

If you have found the bulletin useful or would like to send us feedback for improvements, please let us know by dropping a line to forecaster@islandavalanchebulletin.com

The bulletin is supported by it's users attending our two annual fund raising events, The Party For The Bulletin and the Backcountry Fest as well as by our many Vancouver Island Based sponsors. Please note who they are, let them know if you appreciate their support of the bulletin and patronize them as well!

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the bulletin please get in touch at forecaster@islandavalanchebulletin.com

Take care out there and we'll be back when the snow flies next winter!

Friday 8 April 2016

April 8, 2016 at 11:29AM

This Bulletin Valid Until: Sunday 10 April, 2016 6pm.

DANGER RATINGS (Make sure you understand the danger level meanings)
 
Outlook Friday Saturday Sunday 
Alpine CONSIDERABLE CONSIDERABLE MODERATE
Treeline MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE
Below Tree line LOW LOW LOW

Confidence: Fair more Alpine observations would be helpful. 

Main Concerns: (Avalanche problems) 

Wet Loose- Continued warm temperatures will contribute to the risk of loose wet slides. These could be large in areas of large rock faces and multiple gullies feeding the same line. High freezing level will increase the hazard. Overnight temperatures are staying high so don't expect a freeze cycle in all locations.

Cornices- Strong winds and moist new snow earlier in the month has greatly increased the size of cornices in the alpine and on alpine-like ridge tops at treeline. This continued warm trend will release some of these naturally and may cause large avalanches in isolated areas. 

  Wet Slab-  Dangerous avalanche conditions may exist in the Alpine in lees to SE and SW winds. Natural avalanches are possible. Human triggered avalanches are likely. These could be large on specific features in the Alpine. Slabs will have formed on the highest features in Alpine. Freezing levels will vary so watch specific conditions in your location. This can be a very tricky time of year up high.              

 

Travel/Terrain Advice: Continued warm temperatures will soften surface layers and release cornices. Route finding should allow for this and trip planning should have the goal of not being exposed as the day warms up and the solar aspect gets active. Be aware of consequences if terrain traps exist below as even small slopes may release surface slides.

Past Weather: Freezing levels peaked to over 3500m this week. No precipitation in the last period.

Avalanche Summary: Warm conditions have created lots of pinwheeling, some cornice releases and surface loose activity.

Snow pack Description:   

Surface- Melt conditions exist in most elevations. Crust will have developed and new slabs over 1600m are possible.

Upper-A deep upper snow pack has been settling, small slabs have formed in specific locations above treeline and will be settling .

Mid-New snow accumulations have developed a moderate bond to the crust that gave us high avi hazard earlier in the month.

Lower-Well settled

Weather Forecast:

Friday -  Trace of precipitation. Winds up to 45kmh NW.  Freezing level 3100m.  

Saturday-  No precipitation. Winds up to 30kmh NW. Freezing level 3100m.

Sunday- No precipitation. Winds up to 25kmh SE. Freezing level 2500m. 

 

Avalanche Forecaster- Lyle Fast

Wednesday 6 April 2016

April 6, 2016 at 10:41AM

This Bulletin Valid Until: Friday 8 April, 2016 6pm.

DANGER RATINGS (Make sure you understand the danger level meanings)
 
Outlook Wednesday Thursday Friday 
Alpine CONSIDERABLE CONSIDERABLE MODERATE
Treeline MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE
Below Tree line LOW LOW LOW

Confidence: Fair more Alpine observations would be helpful. 

Main Concerns: (Avalanche problems) 

Wet Loose- Continued warm and even warmer temperatures Thursday will contribute to the risk of loose wet slides. These could be large in areas of large rock faces and multiple gullies feeding the same line. High freezing level will increase the hazard. Overnight temperatures are staying high so don't expect a freeze cycle in all locations.

Cornices- Strong winds and moist new snow earlier in the month has greatly increased the size of cornices in the alpine and on alpine-like ridge tops at treeline. This weeks warming temperatures will release some of these naturally and may cause large avalanches in isolated areas. SW winds have been a factor and may modify things from the more prevenant SE wind effect. 

  Wet Slab-  Dangerous avalanche conditions may exist in the Alpine in lees to SE and SW winds. Natural avalanches are possible. Human triggered avalanches are likely. These could be large on specific features in the Alpine. Slabs will have formed on the highest features in Alpine. Freezing levels will vary so watch specific conditions in your location. This can be a very tricky time of year up high.              

 

Travel/Terrain Advice:This weeks precipitation will have built a few slabs in the Alpine. New precipitation and varing freezing levels will have complicated conditions up high.  Route finding should allow for this and trip planning should have the goal of not being exposed as the day warms up and the solar aspect gets active. Be aware of consequences if terrain traps exist below as even small slopes may release surface slides.

Past Weather: Freezing levels peaked to over 2500m this week. 24-66mm new snow or rain has fallen since Monday depending on elevation. Most fell as rain but more as snow on west coast and high.

Avalanche Summary: Warm conditions have created lots of pinwheeling, some cornice releases and surface loose activity.

Snow pack Description:   

Surface- Melt conditions exist in most elevations. Crust will have developed and new slabs over 1600m are possible.

Upper-A deep upper snow pack has been settling, small slabs have formed in specific locations above treeline and will be settling .

Mid-New snow accumulations have developed a moderate bond to the crust that gave us high avi hazard earlier in the month.

Lower-Well settled

Weather Forecast:

Wednesday -  Trace of precipitation. Winds up to 45kmh SW.  Freezing level 2500m.  

Thursday-  No precipitation. Winds up to 50kmh SE. Freezing level 3700m.

Friday- No precipitation. Winds up to 40kmh SE. Freezing level 3200m. 

 

Avalanche Forecaster- Lyle Fast

View older posts »

End of the Forecasting Season for the Vancouver Island Avalanche Bulletin

April 10, 2016 at 08:33PM

The forecasting season comes to a close today for the Vancouver Island Avalanche Bulletin.

There is still plenty of snow in the Island Alps and avalanche hazard.

For excellent advice on how to manage spring hazards please visit the following page on the Avalanche Canada Website:

http://www.avalanche.ca/fxresources/spring_ovw.pdf

If you have found the bulletin useful or would like to send us feedback for improvements, please let us know by dropping a line to forecaster@islandavalanchebulletin.com

The bulletin is supported by it's users attending our two annual fund raising events, The Party For The Bulletin and the Backcountry Fest as well as by our many Vancouver Island Based sponsors. Please note who they are, let them know if you appreciate their support of the bulletin and patronize them as well!

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the bulletin please get in touch at forecaster@islandavalanchebulletin.com

Take care out there and we'll be back when the snow flies next winter!

Friday 8 April 2016

April 8, 2016 at 11:29AM

This Bulletin Valid Until: Sunday 10 April, 2016 6pm.

DANGER RATINGS (Make sure you understand the danger level meanings)
 
Outlook Friday Saturday Sunday 
Alpine CONSIDERABLE CONSIDERABLE MODERATE
Treeline MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE
Below Tree line LOW LOW LOW

Confidence: Fair more Alpine observations would be helpful. 

Main Concerns: (Avalanche problems) 

Wet Loose- Continued warm temperatures will contribute to the risk of loose wet slides. These could be large in areas of large rock faces and multiple gullies feeding the same line. High freezing level will increase the hazard. Overnight temperatures are staying high so don't expect a freeze cycle in all locations.

Cornices- Strong winds and moist new snow earlier in the month has greatly increased the size of cornices in the alpine and on alpine-like ridge tops at treeline. This continued warm trend will release some of these naturally and may cause large avalanches in isolated areas. 

  Wet Slab-  Dangerous avalanche conditions may exist in the Alpine in lees to SE and SW winds. Natural avalanches are possible. Human triggered avalanches are likely. These could be large on specific features in the Alpine. Slabs will have formed on the highest features in Alpine. Freezing levels will vary so watch specific conditions in your location. This can be a very tricky time of year up high.              

 

Travel/Terrain Advice: Continued warm temperatures will soften surface layers and release cornices. Route finding should allow for this and trip planning should have the goal of not being exposed as the day warms up and the solar aspect gets active. Be aware of consequences if terrain traps exist below as even small slopes may release surface slides.

Past Weather: Freezing levels peaked to over 3500m this week. No precipitation in the last period.

Avalanche Summary: Warm conditions have created lots of pinwheeling, some cornice releases and surface loose activity.

Snow pack Description:   

Surface- Melt conditions exist in most elevations. Crust will have developed and new slabs over 1600m are possible.

Upper-A deep upper snow pack has been settling, small slabs have formed in specific locations above treeline and will be settling .

Mid-New snow accumulations have developed a moderate bond to the crust that gave us high avi hazard earlier in the month.

Lower-Well settled

Weather Forecast:

Friday -  Trace of precipitation. Winds up to 45kmh NW.  Freezing level 3100m.  

Saturday-  No precipitation. Winds up to 30kmh NW. Freezing level 3100m.

Sunday- No precipitation. Winds up to 25kmh SE. Freezing level 2500m. 

 

Avalanche Forecaster- Lyle Fast

Wednesday 6 April 2016

April 6, 2016 at 10:41AM

This Bulletin Valid Until: Friday 8 April, 2016 6pm.

DANGER RATINGS (Make sure you understand the danger level meanings)
 
Outlook Wednesday Thursday Friday 
Alpine CONSIDERABLE CONSIDERABLE MODERATE
Treeline MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE
Below Tree line LOW LOW LOW

Confidence: Fair more Alpine observations would be helpful. 

Main Concerns: (Avalanche problems) 

Wet Loose- Continued warm and even warmer temperatures Thursday will contribute to the risk of loose wet slides. These could be large in areas of large rock faces and multiple gullies feeding the same line. High freezing level will increase the hazard. Overnight temperatures are staying high so don't expect a freeze cycle in all locations.

Cornices- Strong winds and moist new snow earlier in the month has greatly increased the size of cornices in the alpine and on alpine-like ridge tops at treeline. This weeks warming temperatures will release some of these naturally and may cause large avalanches in isolated areas. SW winds have been a factor and may modify things from the more prevenant SE wind effect. 

  Wet Slab-  Dangerous avalanche conditions may exist in the Alpine in lees to SE and SW winds. Natural avalanches are possible. Human triggered avalanches are likely. These could be large on specific features in the Alpine. Slabs will have formed on the highest features in Alpine. Freezing levels will vary so watch specific conditions in your location. This can be a very tricky time of year up high.              

 

Travel/Terrain Advice:This weeks precipitation will have built a few slabs in the Alpine. New precipitation and varing freezing levels will have complicated conditions up high.  Route finding should allow for this and trip planning should have the goal of not being exposed as the day warms up and the solar aspect gets active. Be aware of consequences if terrain traps exist below as even small slopes may release surface slides.

Past Weather: Freezing levels peaked to over 2500m this week. 24-66mm new snow or rain has fallen since Monday depending on elevation. Most fell as rain but more as snow on west coast and high.

Avalanche Summary: Warm conditions have created lots of pinwheeling, some cornice releases and surface loose activity.

Snow pack Description:   

Surface- Melt conditions exist in most elevations. Crust will have developed and new slabs over 1600m are possible.

Upper-A deep upper snow pack has been settling, small slabs have formed in specific locations above treeline and will be settling .

Mid-New snow accumulations have developed a moderate bond to the crust that gave us high avi hazard earlier in the month.

Lower-Well settled

Weather Forecast:

Wednesday -  Trace of precipitation. Winds up to 45kmh SW.  Freezing level 2500m.  

Thursday-  No precipitation. Winds up to 50kmh SE. Freezing level 3700m.

Friday- No precipitation. Winds up to 40kmh SE. Freezing level 3200m. 

 

Avalanche Forecaster- Lyle Fast

View older posts »

Important Notice

This bulletin covers the mountainous region of Vancouver Island from the Mt. Cain Ski Area in the North to the Beaufort range to the South including the mountains of Strathcona Provincial Park.

This is a regional forecast and significant variation may exist within the forecast area. The information and danger ratings are intended as a trip planning aid for recreational, backcountry users of avalanche terrain; they are not meant to be used as the sole factor in determining the avalanche danger presented by a specific slope.

Always include local weather, snowpack and avalanche observations in your decision to travel in avalanche terrain. Observations and experience may lead to different conclusions from what is reported or recommended. See disclaimer for further details. The technical data used to produce these bulletins is obtained from a variety of sources, including local ski areas and remote weather resources.